Bumblebee in spider's web rescued by other bumblebee

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Picture of RedBulletProof37 achievements

+12 1. RedBulletProof commented 7 years ago

This is owesome! How can it bi so accurate with a sting!? :O
Picture of Judge-Jake53 achievements

+8 2. Judge-Jake commented 7 years ago

If I was guessing, I would say that just like when wasps are in distress they release a pheromone that attracts other wasps to come to their aid, the Bumble bee probably has a similar facility. Not sure that the spider actually wanted the bee in it's web either more likely it would try and sever the web to get it out. ;)
Picture of Dmitry33 achievements

+3 3. Dmitry commented 7 years ago

#2 I don't see any reason why a spider wouldn't want a bumblebee, I used to stun wasps and throw them into a spiders web, and the spiders didn't mind them, also centipedes. I wouldn't do it to a kind and gentle creature like a bumblebee, I don't care to find out, I'm glad the bumblebee got rescued by it's kin, I like them even more now.
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0 4. huldu commented 6 years ago

I didn't even know bumblebees could sting! I was taught that they had hooks on the legs that caused a burning sensation. I've never been stung or hit by a bumblebee, they're always so peaceful and minding their own business - unlike wasps and hornets, who will hunt you down on sight.