Pressure wave

Holy shit indeed

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Comments

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Picture of diego300518 achievements

+26 1. diego3005 commented 11 years ago

sweet, that was nice. I like how u can see the wave coming.
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+13 2. xbeakerx commented 11 years ago

that was awesome!! i wonder if that hurt?
Picture of wobble14 achievements

-2 3. wobble commented 11 years ago

It's so cool to have an entire country to blow up shit in.
Picture of darthclericus13 achievements

0 4. darthclericus commented 11 years ago

It's like lookin at those older carpet bombing videos from WWII at a different angle. AWESOME!

BTW... #'s 1 and 5. Get outa here.
Picture of edmund31 achievements

+3 5. edmund commented 11 years ago

Can you calculate how far that was away?
Picture of tastytim39 achievements

-1 6. tastytim commented 11 years ago

it doesn't seem that far away and that preasure wave is really fast, it must be going at the speed of sound (since we hear the boom only when the wave its)
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+22 7. AL7AIR commented 11 years ago

- explosion @0:00
- wace impact @0:03
- speed of sound @ sea level 340.29 m / s
= 1.02 km / 0.63 miles

The actual altitude and air temperature are necessary to calculate the exact distance, so I'd say 20 to 30 meters (60 to 100 feet) give or take.
Picture of Babinizats28 achievements

-3 8. Babinizats commented 11 years ago

The beginning looks fake because the cloud disappears as soon as it goes of. Take a look at it from the beginning. Let me know what you think.
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-4 9. zf1 commented 11 years ago

#6 i doubt it. at 0:00 you can pretty much hear a boom when the explosion happens which means that the pressure wave reaches the camera 3 seconds slower than the speed of sound. that sound you hear when the pressure wave reaches the camera is probably caused by the impact of the wave hitting the camera with great force.

because of the lack of data, it is impossible to calculate that distance. however, we can have an educated guess. according to wikipedia, the speed of sound of dry air at a temperature of 20 °C (68 °F) is 343.14 meters per second. assuming that the temperature in the video is probably a little hotter than that we can assume that the speed is not to far off. since the sound of the boom occurred in less than a second im going to assume that it took at least half a second (if not less) for the sound to reach the camera which would mean that the maximum distance would be about 172 meters or 565 feet (172 x 3.2808399 feet, rounded up). thats about as close as you can get. ;)
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0 10. Widget commented 11 years ago

What country bobs a public road? Only in AMERICA!!!!!!
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Comment rated too low. Show this comment

-5 11. zf1 commented 11 years ago

#10 actually, technically speaking, only FROM America AND Europe (seeing that America (cough..bush) is not the only ass holes bombing innocent civilians)

widget, what country are you from? ...(what? what aint no country i ever heard of do they speak English in what?)
Picture of Raksi36 achievements

+2 12. Raksi commented 11 years ago

#9
1 What you hear is the engine not the sound of the explosion.
2 172 meters? LOL The cameraman would be dead...
3 Sound is pressure. What you see traveling in the dust ,the pressure wave, is THE sound.

Get back to elementary school :-)
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+2 13. SpikedSilver commented 11 years ago

my guess: 1-2 km
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0 14. SpikedSilver commented 11 years ago

btw why is there a mirroring between the first and second picture about the half way between camera and explosion?
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+2 15. Redplague commented 11 years ago

If you take the time it took the blast wave to reach them and multiply that by the speed of sound, you cant tell those guys where standing 1.02 kilometers away from the blast!
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+1 16. Sizzlik (admin) commented 11 years ago

wow...daamn....wonder how it feels outside....big bass baze....jump in the right moment and you fly a couple of meters
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0 17. zf1 commented 11 years ago

#7, #9 i know there is a lot of dumb people on this website but come on, are you really that dumb? 8-)
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-3 18. zf1 commented 11 years ago

#12, you are so retarded.... and please, actually read this post before replying in order to save yourself from looking even more stupid.


first of all, TURN UP YOUR VOLUME!!!!!!! you can CLEARLY hear a boom at the beginning which is different from the engine.

second of all, 172 meters (565 feet) seems reasonable. like USAno1 said, the blast is considerably further than people guessed. and if you think that the camera man would be dead at 172 meters, the he would certainly be dead at 20 -30 meters like #7 said. #7 calculations are completely off and are based on the pressure wave traveling at the speed of sound. maybe you should re read my post #9. the math is very very simple. even the first (flawed) calculation is based on simple math. besides, if you actually read my post i clearly state that it is impossible to calculate that distance because of the lack of data.

third of all, your right, sound is pressure, however, that pressure wave that resulted from the explosion is an entirely different thing. look at how it affects the dust on the ground. tell me what kind of normal sound wave does that. besides you can clearly hear (IF YOU TURN UP YOUR VOLUME) a boom 3 seconds BEFORE the pressure wave reaches the camera.

you said, go back to elementary school, it sounds like you are IN elementary school you dumb ass. 8-)
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0 19. patriotaus commented 11 years ago

#18 go have a cry. so much of that crap annoyed me
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0 20. zf1 commented 11 years ago

#19 so what annoyed you? being right?
Picture of Raksi36 achievements

-1 21. Raksi commented 11 years ago

#18

1: #7 said 1.02km.
"The actual altitude and air temperature are necessary to calculate the exact distance, so I'd say 20 to 30 meters (60 to 100 feet) GIVE or TAKE."
c=c0*SQRT(1+ T/273)

2: 172 meters divided by 3 sec is around 57 meters/sec. Now what kind of SOUND is traveling at this speed?? In air every mechanical wave travels at the speed of sound.

3: "look at how it affects the dust on the ground. tell me what kind of normal sound wave does that. "
That , my friend, is a low frequency, infra wave. A pressure wave with high energy.

And I am retarded? :-)
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+1 22. MsZoomy commented 11 years ago

awesome!!
Do it again!!!
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-2 23. zf1 commented 11 years ago

NOTE: anyone with an IQ below 100, please ignore this message!!! 8-)

#21 listen, im not here to call names, im just trying to make a point which is obvious. you may not be retarded, but you sure are ignorant of the facts. :|


1: whats your point? #7 stated 20 to 30 meters which was based on the pressure wave traveling at the speed of sound. you stated that "172 meters? LOL The cameraman would be dead..." for your information, 20-30 meters is a lot shorter than 172 meters and you are completely dumb or ignorant of plain facts. ;)

for the final time, the pressure wave that jolted the camera wasnt traveling at the speed of sound because you can clearly hear a sound (if you turn up the volume) coming from the explosion 3 seconds before the pressure wave hits the camera. that sound the explosion makes the instance it detonates proves that the pressure wave was not traveling at the speed of sound. this my friend completely discredits the calculation of #7. ;)

why not try and prove #7 instead of just repeating him?

2: your mathematical calculations make absolutely no sense. if my assumptions are correct, your calculation is based on the idea that sound took 3 seconds to reach the camera, which can be disproved, if you turn up your volume and play the video again. so you are dividing the estimated distance 172 meters by the time which you assume it took to reach the camera, 3 seconds, giving you a completely bogus answer. ;)

let me break down how i got my calculation because obviously you dont have a clue:


A: based on the sound which the explosion makes at the very beginning of the video at 0:00, im estimating that it took 1/2 a second for that sound to reach the microphone (camera).

sound of explosion = 1/2 of a second.

B: the speed of sound is 344 meters per second (source: wikipedia)

speed of sound = 344 mps

if you divide the speed of sound by the speed of the explosion you get 172 meters.

344 (speed of sound) / 2 = 172 meters ;)

like i said before, that calculation was an educated guess based on minimal data and was only as an example because people took #7s calculation for face value, although it was completely incorrect. :|

also, you said: "In air every mechanical wave travels at the speed of sound." that is incorrect because the speed of sound is not one single speed. the speed actually varies depending on humidity/dryness, air density, air composition and altitude.

sound is not the same as every mechanical wave. first of all a wave is a force of inertia imposed on an elastic medium causing reactive disturbances. a wave may be associated with the transfer of energy.

an ocean wave, an infra red wave, a photon wave, a gravitational wave, a sound wave and other waves are completely different things and do not travel at the same speed.

3: you said: "That , my friend, is a low frequency, infra wave. A pressure wave with high energy."

even if that is true (which it may not be), it isnt the same as sound.

i tried to search everywhere but i could not find the term "infra wave". i believe there isnt such a term. could you please provide a legitimate source verifying that "infra wave" is an actual term and isnt something made up?

you could mean "infrared wave", but that is something completely different from sound.


i have a theory: you dont care what the facts are you just like to disagree with me. and that makes you retarded.
Picture of zf140 achievements

-1 24. zf1 commented 11 years ago

looking into this further, i have concluded that the phenomenon is this video is a "shock wave" :O

according to wikipedia, a shock wave is much faster than the speed of sound. after doing some research, i concluded that: 1: the "boom" sound heard at the moment of explosion at 0:00 is most likely caused by the first instance of the shock wave. if they were using something similar to TNT, the speed would be about 6,900 meters a second (source wikipedia). the force that effects the camera and the dust on the ground is the trailing section of the shock wave.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_wave

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Detonation_velocity


i guess the training edge could be traveling the speed of sound but that would mean that the bridge was 1032 meters away (3386 feet, or just under a mile) and that the shock wave was traveling at a speed of roughly 1/6th of a second. that seems reasonable :) .

if that is true credits to: #13 spikedsilver and #15 redplague!!! :D

(that still doesnt credit #7 and #21, sorry >:) )
Picture of Raksi36 achievements

+1 25. Raksi commented 11 years ago

#23: For The Love of GOD!

1:For the tird time, number #7 said the Distance is 1020 meters PLUS/MINUS 20-30 meters! That means 990 to 1050! NOT 20-30 meters!!!

2: "an ocean wave, an infra red wave, a photon wave, a gravitational wave, a sound wave and other waves are completely different things and do not travel at the same speed."

DUDE Seriously... What did I say?
"In air"!!
And you mention OCEAN wave?? Water?? An other Medium? Of course the speed of the wave is different in other mediums!
In water it's about 1500m/s. But still depends from temperature, density etc,etc whatyousaid...

"mechanical"
And you mention infra red...

"In air every mechanical wave travels at the speed of sound." that is incorrect because the speed of sound is not one single speed. the speed actually varies depending on humidity/dryness, air density, air composition and altitude."

Yes thats true. That's why #7 said +- 20-30 meters! And that's why I wrote down the formula for Temperature to demonstrate.

3:"your mathematical calculations make absolutely no sense"
True. Those nonsense calculations were based on yours.
You said, the distance is 172 meters.
The pressure wave travels for 3 secs.
SO! The pressure wave's speed is 57 meters/sec.
Of course it's wrong.


4: Sorry my English is very bad. What i meant is
Infrasonic wave "en wikipedia org/wiki/Infrasound"
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+1 26. Raksi commented 11 years ago

Dude... Everybody except you guessed about 1km!!
Including #7 #13 #15 And ME!!!
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0 27. Fergus_Thedog commented 11 years ago

Uh... Excuse me Sir, but how can the shock wave travel "at a speed of roughly 1/6th of a second"?? 1/6th of a second isn't speed, it's time. Perhaps you need another comment to explain it again.. XD
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0 28. zf1 commented 11 years ago

#26 well, credits to you too i guess :D still, im acknowledging the possibility of 1km based on the fact that it was a shock wave... even though i may believe it, it doesnt mean its correct ;)

there is no physical proof that the phenomenon that reached the camera at 3 seconds was traveling at the speed of sound. there is only assumptions. regardless if it is accurate or not, there is no way of proving it with lack of data to support it. i only acknowledge it because information acquired from further research about detonations only suggested that it was possible. according to wikipedia, shock waves come in various forms and the kind generated by an explosive force has a trailing force. im acknowledging the the possibility that it could have been traveling at the speed of sound, but wikipedia hasnt verified that. it was only my assumption.

also, nobody acknowledged that it was a shock wave or that there was even a boom at the beginning. you claimed that the boom was the sound of an engine. my original estimations were based on what little data i had to draw conclusions and i made that very well clear in my first post.

please forgive me in my lack of patience, but we are all drawing partially flawed conclusions from the lack of information.

#27 please forgive my prior statement... what i meant was that the shock wave took 1/6th of a second to reach the camera at 6,900 meters per second. my bad :)
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0 29. sirgalahad commented 11 years ago

Guys, guys! Can you please stop arguing?!?! Who really cares what distance the cameraman is from the explosion? Who cares if the pressure wave is traveling at the speed of sound? NO ONE!!!!!!
Just watch the vid, and leave the science to the scientists, PLEASE!
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+1 30. w00tw00t commented 9 years ago

zf1 from a moderator i expect more!! You have to go down as the biggest maths and physics fail, i have ever seen!! All relevant data is here to do the calculation. You first see the explosion then you hear it. You cant hear and see an explosion at the same time, for that to happen the speed of sound would have to be the same as the speed of light. To be honest you have no idea what you are talking about and i suggest you go back to school.