What happens when we try to walk in a straight line blindfolded.

We can't go straight :(

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Picture of rUmmeh32 achievements

+45 1. rUmmeh commented 9 years ago

So we're doomed to walk in circles for the rest of our lives. Sick.
Picture of shayangx43 achievements

+45 2. shayangx commented 9 years ago

Well I think its because for us humen visual stimulation is very important for our motorfunction. Perhaps some trainign would make a lot of difference. i think a blind person would be able to walk in a straight line, simply because hes trained to function without visual stimulation.
Picture of Dario1032 achievements

+25 3. Dario10 commented 9 years ago

Beautiful animation :)
Picture of 01nvr50 achievements

+20 4. 01nvr commented 9 years ago

Any more videos in this series? Loved the animation :)
Picture of archis51 achievements

+6 5. archis commented 9 years ago

There are to options. You can walk streight line (wich is a ideal case, nothing is absolute) or you can make a turn (you can't follow a ideal streight line, you will make turn)-> so you will go in some sort off loops in any case, the only question is how big the loops will be.

This clip somehow reminds me of Robert O'Hara Burke (Leader of Australian explorers who were the first Europeans to cross Australia from south to north). He was in charge of explorer team, but in the same time he could not find the way home after drinking in the bar, nevertheless, the bar was next to his home.
Picture of Kendiana29 achievements

+18 6. Kendiana commented 9 years ago

That's what happened to me when I "Failed" my field sobriety test. Hell, I wasn't even blindfolded. Hiccup :P
Picture of dushan56 achievements

+4 7. dushan commented 9 years ago

:) well, maybe it's simple, human anatomy does not have 100% vertical balance, eg. right side of the body is slightly heavier than the left side...
Picture of Dqrkstone6 achievements

+3 8. Dqrkstone commented 9 years ago

Fascinating; Going to try it in a field with my mates - set them walking whilst filming them :(|)
Picture of kmmde41 achievements

+3 9. kmmde commented 9 years ago

I bet it's because the earth is spinning - like water in a flushed toilet.
Picture of knospi36 achievements

+6 10. knospi commented 9 years ago

they should have asked a blind guy to do the test! Maybe he can walk straight?
Picture of Skeesicks38 achievements

+5 11. Skeesicks commented 9 years ago

#2, #10...i don't think so.

Even he is blind, he uses other points of reference, like sound, or he uses his stick...or dog :-).

I think he will walk circles as othere people as well..
Picture of Randyio50 achievements

+5 12. Randyio commented 9 years ago

I think it's cuz one leg is stronger and/or a bit longer than the other.
Picture of zerorain26 achievements

+4 13. zerorain commented 9 years ago

for a second there i thought they were the mythbusters Adam and Jamie.
Picture of Eddie8747 achievements

+2 14. Eddie87 commented 9 years ago

i and 2 friends walked on the top of a mountain (almost a flat surface) once and it became night we walked in a circle (to the right) we ended in the same position 2 times, and later on the trip we saw city light even then we startet walking a little bit to the right, its very weird. :O
Picture of brownhaze9 achievements

+5 15. brownhaze commented 9 years ago

Definitive evidence that our right nuts our bigger than the left.
Picture of shayangx43 achievements

+3 16. shayangx commented 9 years ago

#11 yes so he learns to use other sensorial stimuli to help his motorfunction. But when you take away the main sense of a person hes not able to learn right away to use other senses to help him to walk in a straight line.
Picture of Klawd331 achievements

-3 17. Klawd3 commented 9 years ago

They walked perfectly straight.. never heard that the earth is moving?
Picture of iovnzu38 achievements

+10 18. iovnzu commented 9 years ago

oh my god....we are all DRUNK!!!!
Picture of Saxonnielsen31 achievements

+4 19. Saxonnielsen commented 9 years ago

Nice video! As a first thought on the cause, it could be related to the Coriolis effect - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coriolis_effect
Picture of theWatcherAlpha24 achievements

+4 20. theWatcherAlpha commented 9 years ago

For the case of walking, noticed that most of them go right or in clockwise. This implies that right-handedness is a possible factor. Lets say the person is not blindfolded how can he/she move in a straight line? Normally, I believe, people use visual coordination or other form of reference to maintain a straight heading. But without some form of reference it is not possible to maintain a straight route, after all walking is a constant forward falling motion. Another way to explain this phenomenon: Lets say the person travels in a straight line for the first 30m, at the 30.01m he changes direction by 0.01 degree from his straight heading and continues walking forward perfectly. It is easy to see that eventually he will miss his destination by a few kilometers if the destination is a few hundred kilometers away. For human, when we walk, it is very easy to change our heading, with every steps, by a few degrees. Without reference to correct our heading, it is not strange for the mind to perform the basic heuristic to begin identify a possible reference. Noticed that the basic method to identify one's heading is by turning in one direction. In the case of a right-handed person, it is possible that turning right is more preferable than left. This is a simple explanation based on instinct and haven't consider much in term of physical aspect.
Picture of cretia27 achievements

+6 21. cretia commented 9 years ago

this guy above me talks way tooo much blah blah blah
Picture of fig45702 achievements

+3 22. fig4570 commented 9 years ago

it's because we cant focus on one thing
Picture of ringmaster54 achievements

+4 23. ringmaster commented 9 years ago

I blindfolded a girl once, she wasn't straight afterwards and the fun ended.
Picture of nyli1332 achievements

+5 24. nyli13 commented 9 years ago

This is the kind of snotr videos i like!
Picture of ninocka37 achievements

+3 25. ninocka commented 9 years ago

uhm..vid repeat, admins?
Picture of Bream7333 achievements

+2 26. Bream73 commented 9 years ago

Theres a vid somewhere on snotr about a blind dog that has learned to use sound (his bark) bouncing off surrounding objects to get around. Sorry dont have link.
Picture of starfvcker16 achievements

+3 27. starfvcker commented 9 years ago

very funny video :D and interesting
Picture of cyberdevil32 achievements

+1 28. cyberdevil commented 8 years ago

So what about blind people? Can't they walk straight without seeing where they're going? I think I read somewhere that the reason we can't go straight is because one side of the body is heavier than the other, the imbalance moves us ever so slowly towards one side.
Picture of loadrunner54 achievements

0 29. loadrunner commented 8 years ago

When someone is born blind, he can walk in a perfect straight line
Picture of Premtm36 achievements

+1 30. Premtm commented 8 years ago

This explains why Moses wandered in the desert for 40 years...... :D