Mars in a Minute: Is Mars Really Red?

Mars is often known as the "Red Planet,” but is it really red? This video answers one of the most frequently asked questions about our planetary neighbor.

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Picture of Oddi50 achievements

+8 1. Oddi commented 8 years ago

Wow..i wanna keep the Mars image from Isaac Asimov books and Total Recall movie dont mess wit ma mind! O:)
Picture of BarraMacAnna29 achievements

+8 2. BarraMacAnna commented 8 years ago

So basically, YES it's a red PLANET..just like we're a blue PLANET..Everything up close/magnified is multi-coloured and this combination of colours at a distance reveals the dominant colour...would you see the white lines on a tennis ball at the same distance to scale? I'm sitting in my bedroom here and see no blue! (well except for my jeans..billions of jeans would make a planet blue! hmm..everyone does wear jeans these days)
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-6 3. LQoQK commented 8 years ago

kinda reminded me between the difference of white people and black, when while people get sick they are yellow, get embarrassed they are red, sick they get blue, but black people always black. :x
so yeah are white people really white :D
Picture of librabooks40 achievements

+2 4. librabooks commented 8 years ago

I can sleep much better tonight knowing this.
Picture of BarraMacAnna29 achievements

+22 5. BarraMacAnna commented 8 years ago

#3, I think you're referring to this old poem:
(It was released as a music video too, but in a racist way and has explicit language, which has no place on snotr or our world!)

When I was born, I was black.
When I grew up, I was black.
When I get hot, I am black.
When I get cold, I am black.
When I am sick, I am black.
When I die, I am black.

When you were born, You were pink.
When you grew up, You were white.
When you get hot, You go red.
When you get cold, You go blue.
When you are sick, You go green.
When you die, You go green.

And yet you have the cheek to call me coloured!

(p.s. Why does race always have to come into everything?! I only posted this as reference to number 3..Let it go people of our blue planet!!)
Picture of MurderVictim18 achievements
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-13 6. MurderVictim commented 8 years ago

I'm white and proud.
I'm also heterosexual and proud.
Picture of cranky40 achievements

+10 7. cranky commented 8 years ago

#6 I'm proud not to be one of the "proud" ones.
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0 8. spla300 commented 8 years ago

WTF?! How can anything oxidize on mars when there is no oxygen or water??????
Someone please explain....
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+1 9. thorargent commented 8 years ago

#8 you post a very good question that nobody seems to actually think about. Mars had oceans once but some of that water is lost to space (low gravity) and some is in the form of glaciers today under the dust. But there had to be free oxygen present at some point, just like the Great Rusting here on Earth long ago. This implies that there was some form of life to produce enough oxygen to make this happen. Rusty rocks are one compelling piece of evidence, and the huge quantities of sulfate compounds is another. All the sulfuric acid could not have formed to make those compounds without a huge amount of water and oxygen, regardless of the official NASA position. It's basic chemistry.
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0 10. sjmaze commented 8 years ago

That would be cool if Mars sand tastes like butterscotch.